we will be better as a nation when

all of our communities

are well
we will be better as a nation when

all of our communities

are well

Even with the hard-fought efforts of the Civil Rights Movement, the disastrous effects of slavery and the toxic aftermath of a country fractured by hatred have shaped the South and ignored its deepest suffering. Until we address these wounds, not just with empathy, but with action, the full promise of America will remain unfulfilled.

April 1865 marked the end of four years of bloodshed and battle for America’s soul as the Civil War came to its conclusion. President Abraham Lincoln began implementing his plan to reconstruct and reunite the nation, but was gunned down days later by a man sympathetic to the Confederacy. Thus, a moment of triumph was disrupted, and subsequent attempts to undo the damage caused by centuries of slavery were hardly effective. Under President Johnson, Lincoln’s successor, feuds over resources and ongoing efforts of oppression undermined any notion of unification.

The South’s failed attempts at Reconstruction have left a gap in our country’s foundation and moral obligation to liberty for all. The time for Reconstruction is now - one that is honest, earnest, and bold, but most importantly, that focuses on orienting America towards a future rooted in justice and equity.

We will be better as a nation
when all of our communities are well.

© 2020 The Southern Reconstruction Fund